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70 of 365: First visit to Agricola

70 of 365: First visit to Agricola

Agricola Pears (agricolaeatery.com)

Agricola Pears (agricolaeatery.com)

About Agricola

Agricola, a Princeton based farm-to-plate restaurant, has been here for about a year, and tonight was my first opportunity to visit. Agricola’s own site says “Using fresh local ingredients from our very own Great Road Farm as well as from other neighboring providers, we serve food that brings people together to laugh, share and celebrate. Good…

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So I have kept this in for a few weeks, but I wanted to get it off my chest, because it made me really, deeply angry. I was having breakfast with my kids at outdoor seating at a local breakfast joint, as we tend to do, so we are less disturbing to others as we talk and laugh and carry on. I tend to be especially affectionate with my kids. We often hug, kiss, and express our love for one another openly.

There have been times when people have come up as they are leaving and note how fantastic it is that we have such an obvious loving relationship, how well-behaved my boys are, and that we do each other a service in our familial relationship. It’s true: my boys and I both benefit deeply from the affection and respect that we share for each other. It is a gift that I treasure, this relationship.

At any rate, I wanted to get on WiFi at this place to upload one of our Saturday Selfies that we do, and it required a password from the establishment. I decided the easiest thing to do was to leave my 9 and 6 year olds at the table, step inside the restaurant and ask for the password. I was not concerned in the least, because the windows in this place make it very easy to see what is going on outside at all times, and I never lost track of them. I noticed that the couple next to us at breakfast was talking to my boys as they were leaving, and I came back out to see what was at issue, if anything. The couple had already packed up and were on their way back to their car when I got back to the table.

When I asked what exchanged when I was inside, my oldest said that the gentleman said that “If anyone ever touches you, kids, tell your teacher.” He said it was strange, and that he wasn’t sure why the man had said it. I calmly replied that it was good advice to share any odd behavior from adults with other adults, like their parents or other authorities, and that the man was likely just being helpful. I thanked them for telling me about the couple’s behavior, for instance, and that I always want to know if anyone ever says anything odd or out-of-place to them. I scanned the lot to see if they were still around because I’d have loved to have had a word with the couple myself, but it was probably for the best that they were already gone.

But it was clear that the couple had misinterpreted my open affection with my kids as a hint at parental pedophilia. I don’t know that if I was abusing my children that I’d be so bold as to hint at it in public. I suppose I should be grateful that others are looking out for my children, but are we so deeply conservative in our society that my actions could even be interpreted as anything but love between father and sons? I will say this: I refuse to be less affectionate to my children out of fear of its misinterpretation, and instead hope that we can socially stop jumping to conclusions about what someone’s intentions are simply because their own experiences, perhaps a more conservative parental relationship, differ from mine with my sons.

69 of 365: On being accused of being too affectionate with my boys So I have kept this in for a few weeks, but I wanted to get it off my chest, because it made me really, deeply angry.

65 of 365: A library design problem solved, perhaps.

65 of 365: A library design problem solved, perhaps.

nowhere placemark geolocation by John LeMasney via lemasney.com

nowhere placemark geolocation by John LeMasney via lemasney.com

I was alerted to Toby Greenwalt’s great blog theanalogdivide by Sophie Brookover of Library Link NJ, in which Toby just proposed a series of design problems as they relate to libraries. I love a good design problem. Here he introduces the first problem, and below I answer it in my own way.

“Your first challenge? Create a online…

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60 of 365: Using Pinterest to Gain a Visual Following (book chapter as serial post, part 2)

60 of 365: Using Pinterest to Gain a Visual Following (book chapter as serial post, part 2)

Please visit the first entry in this series and stay tuned for the following parts of this chapter.

What makes Pinterest a preferable social network for organizations such as libraries to embrace?

Pinterest is a social network (a place where people come together to connect) which focuses on visual content, such as pictures, graphics, diagrams, logos, videos, animations and other imagery. In fact,…

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58 of 365: We are living in Orwell’s 1984

58 of 365: We are living in Orwell’s 1984

Yevgeny Zamyatin (1923)

Yevgeny Zamyatin (1923) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I’m not one to be especially paranoid, generally speaking. In fact, I tend to think of myself as generally stable, pragmatic, and realistic. I go on what I sense. However, recently, I began thinking deeply about all the trails we are leaving, especially my own, and how easy it is to know the deeper part, the private part, of who I am, easily.

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57 of 365: A Call to Libraries to Devise Policy Regarding Patron Consumer Devices.

57 of 365: A Call to Libraries to Devise Policy Regarding Patron Consumer Devices.

phone by John LeMasney via lemasney.com

phone by John LeMasney via lemasney.com

I recently had the opportunity via LibraryLinkNJ to speak on the topic of Consumer Device Support in Libraries at several of their Tech Speed Dating gatherings, in which librarians from across the state of New Jersey come together to learn about the technologies they might love. It is a platform for dissemination of new technologies and best practices, but…

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56 of 365: A three dimensional coffee cup in SketchUp

56 of 365: A three dimensional coffee cup in SketchUp

55 of 365 Coffee Mug by John LeMasney via lemasney.com

55 of 365 Coffee Mug by John LeMasney via lemasney.com

This is a three-dimensional coffee cup created in SketchUp, the Trimble-owned, free, three-dimensional modeling application. Given the increased importance of making and three-dimensional printing in contemporary libraries, I have decided to focus a bit on 3D modeling as an area to extend myself into.  I taught a class on this for a full-day…

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